Can DNA be the Prize to Your Blissful Food Lifestyle?

What if you could determine if drinking a glass of red wine everyday was truly the path toward optimal health for you. Or discover that a daily cup of coffee could cure cancer for just you. Perhaps we are what we eat.

Why is it that one diet that works that great for my best friend fails miserably for me? On the web and through thousands of blog articles, books, nutrition modeling it seems everyone has found the perfect diet for me. However, when I try to follow many of these solutions… My results are so different. Is it in my genes or am I just unlucky that I cannot be a size zero?

Could it be possible that a DNA test may choose the best foods and diets for me. DNA testing has become increasingly popular in recent years. Understanding my DNA, genetic make-up, family history and where I came from might possibly be the secret to my essential health.

DNA testing is an area of that is exploding beyond forensics. Companies like 23andMe have harnessed the power of DNA testing to at least help you learn about your ancestry by region, your medical make-up to include your risks. Science is evolving to the point that can even explore the effects of food to your genetic make-up. According to Ahmed El-Sohemy, the founder and chief scientific officer of Nutirgenomix, “We have known for a long time that some individuals respond differently from others to the same foods, beverages, nutrients, and supplements they consume. That is, a one- size-fits-all approach to optimal nutrition may just be ineffective.

“DNA companies refer to these tests as ‘personalized dietary advice,’ which stems from the theory that human needs vary considerably from diet to diet,” according to Ahmed. “For example, ketosis might work wonders on one person, helping regulate insulin levels and thereby adding to weight loss. Another person might respond differently due to various health factors such and indications that there might be other issues in the body. This could include your microbiome?

Gut bacteria has also become increasingly interesting pertaining to diet. We do know that gut microbiome is closely linked to our immune system. These bacteria help to produce micronutrients such as vitamins and antioxidants from the food we eat. It also does a good job at breaking down macronutrients to disease digestion.

It might be interesting to see what my genes can teach me perhaps about my food choices. Depending on my make-up, I might find that perhaps the Mediterranean Diet might work best. Or perhaps fermentation is what I need. Think about it. My ancestry could give guidance to at least start on a path towards optimal health. I don’t think that it will be end all solution though, since personalization will go beyond what our ancestors did eat from what our food systems available today are. After all, they ate simple meal choices based on their surroundings and did get plenty of exercise too.

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